Wednesday, August 13, 2008

still remember some tagalog terms?

Being a true blooded Filipino, I admit that sometimes it makes me feel guilty not to recognize the "Tagalog" term of a certain thing.

The invasion of Americans and Spaniards brought too much influence to the evolution of language in the Philippines. And because of this, Filipinos seem to be the most easy to get adapted with their languages. Even reaching to a point of forgetting to speak our own language in straight manner. We unconsciously get to speak "taglish" if not appearing to be "konyo" individuals.

In my roaming around the blogosphere, I noticed that out of 100% Filipino bloggers, about 80% uses foreign language. While the remaining percentage are those who still advocate the use of Tagalog which is more conventional of course. Because of this fact, it simply shows that we, Filipinos, are the ones easy to learn foreign language esp. on the English language. The only sad thing out of it perhaps is that going beyond that wit, we even forget the tagalog term of a certain thing.

But of course, you don't go to the store to say, "Pabili nga ng kwaderno." But will say, "Pabili nga ng notebook." Otherwise you will appear "makata" for your straight tagalog or the one you're talking to doesn't exactly understand the term "kwaderno". Owing the fact that you are both Filipinos. We have become used to our taglish way of speaking such as "Natapos mo na ba ang homework mo?" or "Magda-drive ako mamaya."

The term "konyo", however, is a neologism that refers to the people often considered to be the children of affluent families. They are often tagged to be "sossy" in a way. Example of this is, "Let's make tusok ng fishballs". Konyo is a phrase combining the English verb "make" with the base form of the tagalog verb.

The term "cake" for example is still "keyk" in sound but only differs in spelling. This is what we call "borrowed term." The terms "mama o papa" that we got from the Spaniards that we are still using as we address our parents. These great influences only prove that even language evolves and changes from time to time. But inspite of this, may we not forget too our national language even we have already gone far and have traveled around the globe.

12 comments:

Panaderos said...

I like this post. Although I write in English, I try to write in straight Filipino whenever the situation calls for it. Examples would be when I respond to a reader's comment on my blog. Although I may not be successful 100% of the time, I still try to write in straight Filipino during those moments.

Cristielle-Love R. Adriano said...

ei nyl.. i added u up already..

i'm looking for a cbox to put dis msg but i didn't find 1... so i decided 2 put it here...

hehe..

keep blogging!!



(a.k.a. love)

atticus said...

minsan may tumawag sa akin. mag-aapply raw siyang writer.

sabi kasi niya..."ask ko lang po if you still, like, need a writer?"

ni hindi ko na siya pina-email ng resume niya.

moral of the story: If you are looking for a job that involves writing, straight Filipino or English IS a minimum requirement.

Avee said...

wow this is a cool lesson, I know some deep tagalog words but when you use them in a sentence nakakatuwa kc bka di ka maintindihan.

salamat po sa dalaw, i appreciate it much

Keith said...

Unless I come back to the Phils to live, I may not have the opportunity to try to learn Tagalog, or any Phil dialect again....

I think there is a value in preserving the integrity of a language.

Of course, what is the "pure" language? The words salamat, and mahal have only been a part of your language for less than six hundred years...

Hmmmm....

Annamanila said...

You're right. Language evolves. It is never static. It adopts/adapts to foreign influences. A scrabble addict like me for example has to memorize about a hundred new words every so often to keep up to date.

Like many Filipinos, I too find it hard to speak and write straight Pilipino. We need a custodian of our language to expand it, nurture it, promote it, etc.

Mari said...

i grew up hearing my mama speak deep tagalog words and up to this date, i still use them. sometimes, my kids don't understand me and there are times, too, that my boyfriend couldn't grasp the meaning of the tagalog word either.
today in day to day lingo, taglish is the norm and add to that, txtspeak. :(

Mari said...

*in our day to day lingo*
it's the keyboard. :)

TK said...

it is inevitable that Tagalog and English will fuse into a coherent language with its own merits sometime in the not so distant future.

Kahit mag tayo ng isang Akademya ng tulad nung sa mga Pranses (Académie française) para ma preserba ang tagalog at maiwasan ang paghahalo nito sa Ingles, ang mga kabataan sa susunod na salinlahi ang magpupumilit magsalita ng pinaglahok na Tagalog/English... para lamang ipakitang sila ang dapat masunod, at tayong mga matatandang ulyanin ay hwag dapat makialam.

Salamat po sa pagbisita sa blog (blogo?) ng mga anak ko.

Hendrawan said...

because of that invasion you have fluently english cliff.. That mirror picture shows randomly friend..

there are 5 type of pictures that shows randomly every you refresh the pages..

thanks for visiting.

pchi said...

i agree!

it's the language that evolves according to how people use it

would you ever consider talking in a Francisco Balagtas manner?

of course not...

It sounds weird if we do that now.
I think English also underwent same transformations:

Anglo-saxon,shakespearian, etc

unless in formal contexts, i think mixing languages together is not a big deal as long as we send the message across

after all, language is there so we can communicate

minsan, sinusubukan ko pa rin na magsulat at magsalita ng purong Filipino, purong Ingles o purong Bisaya kung kinakailangan

great post...

can we ex-links? hehe

chroneicon said...

ano po ang tagalog ng prutas na orange?

natanong lang...